Cia Verschelden

Bandwidth Recovery
The American Association of Colleges and Universities, USA
Cia Verschelden

Cia Verschelden is the Special Projects Advisor for the Integration of Academic and Student Affairs at the American Association of Colleges and Universities, USA. She was most recently Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs at Malcolm X College in Chicago. Her administrative experiences include Executive Director of Institutional Assessment at the University of Central Oklahoma, Vice President of Academic Affairs at Highland Community College, and Director of Assessment at Kansas State University, where she was on the faculty for 21 years. She has taught social welfare and social policy, women’s studies, sociology, and nonviolence studies. Cia has a BS in psychology from Kansas State University, a Masters in Social Work (MSW) from the University of Connecticut, and an EdD from Harvard University.

Cia’s books (click the links below for details of how to order and claim a 20% discount): 

Develop your teaching with Cia Verschelden
How to Help Your Students by Minimising Uncertainty
How to Help Your Students by Minimising Uncertainty
by Cia Verschelden
Cia, from our partners the American Association of Colleges and Universities, shares her thoughts on why seeking to minimise uncertainty is a vital step for both faculty and students and she invites OneHE members to share their hopes and worries for the new semester. Join the discussion about practical steps that can be taken to minimise uncertainty and learn more about the concept of 'bandwidth'.
Video discussion
Bandwidth Stealers and How to Recover: Belonging Uncertainty
Bandwidth Stealers and How to Recover: Belonging Uncertainty
by Cia Verschelden

When students are not sure they belong in a class or on campus, they may struggle to be academically successful. There are things we can do in our classrooms and other learning settings to nurture students' sense of belonging.

Course
Bandwidth Stealers And How To Recover: Stereotype Threat and Identity Threat
Bandwidth Stealers And How To Recover: Stereotype Threat and Identity Threat
by Cia Verschelden

When students are members of groups about whom there are negative stereotypes, performance can be depressed by worry about confirming those stereotypes. Learning spaces can be identity-safe or identity-threat environments, with resultant positive or deleterious effects on student learning.

Course
Bandwidth Recovery: Helping Students Reclaim Cognitive Resources
Bandwidth Recovery: Helping Students Reclaim Cognitive Resources
by Cia Verschelden
The goal of this learning path is to help you maximise your students cognitive capacity for learning by tackling bandwidth stealer factors and social realities that make it harder for some students to reach their full academic potential.
Learning path
Bandwidth Stealers And How To Recover: Microaggressions And Ground Rules
Bandwidth Stealers And How To Recover: Microaggressions And Ground Rules
by Cia Verschelden

Microaggressions are small, subtle insults, slights, and invalidations that eat away at self-confidence and make people feel unsure, unsafe, and constantly vigilant. All this uncertainty depletes bandwidth. We can create learning spaces where microaggressions are minimised and where everyone can learn.

Course
Introduction To Bandwidth Recovery
Introduction To Bandwidth Recovery
by Cia Verschelden

Due to social phenomena like poverty, racism, classism, ableism, homophobia, xenophobia, and other 'differentisms', many students arrive at college with depleted cognitive capacity for learning. Teachers can use strategies in our classrooms to help them recover.

Course
Bandwidth Stealers and How to Recover: Adverse Childhood Experiences
Bandwidth Stealers and How to Recover: Adverse Childhood Experiences
by Cia Verschelden

The potential long-term effects of childhood trauma on adult health and well-being have been strongly documented in public health research. We can create learning environments that support students whose learning might be impaired by those negative effects.

Course